AuthorLRIRE

Race as Unintellectual

ABSTRACT For the past forty years, efforts to racially integrate the nation’s most selective universities have coalesced around a central idea: underrepresented racial minorities have unique perspectives, and universities are unable to provide the highest quality of education without incorporating those perspectives into their campus community. When specifying the unique contributions that...

“Obvious Injustice” and Qualified Immunity: The Legacy of Hope v. Pelzer

ABSTRACT Qualified immunity has captured popular attention in the wake of multiple high-profile killings of civilians by police due to its role in shielding officers and other public officials from legal accountability for constitutional rights violations if the specific conduct at issue has not previously been held unconstitutional. Since creating the doctrine in 1982, the U.S. Supreme Court has...

The Gender Panopticon: AI, Gender, and Design Justice

ABSTRACT Using recent research from data scientists and technologists, this Article argues that we are at a contradictory moment in history regarding the intersection of gender and technology, particularly as it affects lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) communities. At the very same moment that we see the law embracing more and more visibility regarding gender identities and...

Stealing Education

ABSTRACT While most state constitutions include provisions that indicate a commitment to equal access to education within one state, that commitment remains unfulfilled. This Article shines a light on a practice that has been overlooked by those concerned about school district inequality, but that contributes to this incongruity: a phenomenon I call “stealing education.” A parent “steals”...

Choosing Life Over Liberty and Property: Environmental Justice in a World Ravaged by Climate Change

ABSTRACT Harms to communities of color and poor communities are set to increase in light of climate change. These communities are vulnerable to climate-induced disasters largely because of historical, social and economic inequities. While this is generally true for vulnerable communities throughout the world, the scope of this Comment is limited to vulnerable communities within the United States...

Monuments of American Sorrow

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic not only exposed the socio-political and economic hardships that plague vulnerable communities across the United States, but it also challenged academicians with caregiving responsibilities.  Teaching from home threatened the very notion of work-life balance.  Compounding these pressures, faculty members were tasked with teaching online amidst the traumas of the...

Remaking Appalachia: Ecosocialism, Ecofeminism, and Law: A Conversation With Author Nicholas F. Stump and Professor Priya Baskaran

Abstract We are living in a moment of nearly constant, cascading ecological crises.  In the United States alone, we have witnessed record-breaking heat waves in the Pacific Northwest, increased forest fires in California, worsening hurricanes in the Gulf Coast, and massive flooding in the Midwest and on the East Coast—all in the summer of 2021.  The need for transformative ecological...

From Academic Freedom to Cancel Culture: Silencing Black Women in the Legal Academy

ABSTRACT In 1988, Black women law professors formed the Northeast Corridor Collective of Black Women Law Professors, a network of Black women in the legal academy. They supported one another’s scholarship, shared personal experiences of systemic gendered racism, and helped one another navigate the law school white space. A few years later, their stories were transformed into articles that...