Authoruclalaw

How Not to Lie About Affirmative Action

This Article empirically examines the six primary deficiencies impacting extant research on affirmative action in law schools and highlights how inattention to—and sometimes outright disregard for—these issues continues to muddy the debate over affirmative action.

The Hollowed Out Common Law

We measure the evolution of the common law using a comprehensive data set of cases regarding the enforceability of online consumer contracts. We find a steady decline in the number of cases adjudicated in state courts relative to federal courts, and a parallel rise in class actions migrating to federal courts. Erie notwithstanding, the common law is driven by federal court decisions, building...

Codification and the Hidden Work of Congress

This Article provides the first in-depth scholarly examination of the process by which enacted laws are organized and presented for public consumption, known as codification, a process that has mostly escaped the notice of judges and scholars of legislation, and even fails to make it into textbooks meant to introduce lawyers to the creation and interpretation of law. It argues that the failure to...

Abortion Regulation as Compelled Speech

This Article outlines a novel First Amendment compelled speech claim against a growing body of abortion restrictions, including fetal demise and burial laws, premised on a state interest in “expressing respect for potential life.” It weaves Fourteenth Amendment limitations together with developments set out last year in NIFLA v. Becerra to demonstrate that the Court’s expanding First Amendment...

Derivable Works

From sequels and spin-offs to physical merchandise, copyright and trademark law together give a creative work’s owner exclusive control over a range of derivative products. This Article argues that, under the right conditions, that control can tilt artistic investment away from standalone works and toward the ones that are most likely to generate future derivatives. It explores this phenomenon...

Big Data Prosecution and Brady

As helpful as new forms of centralized data collection might be for investigators, there remains a critical open issue: the systems were not designed to identify the exculpatory and impeaching material prosecutors are required to disclose under Brady v. Maryland. This Article is the first to examine the design flaw at the core of the intelligence-driven prosecution model – a flaw that creates a...

The Civil Rights of Health: A New Approach to Challenging Structural Inequality

An emerging literature on the social determinants of health reveals that subordination is a major driver of public health disparities. This body of research makes possible a powerful new alliance between public health and civil rights advocates: an initiative to promote the “civil rights of health.” Understanding health as a matter of justice, and civil rights law as a health intervention, has...

Brief Thoughts on Fair Use and Third-Party Harm: Another Reappraisal of Patrick Cariou v. Richard Prince

The critical literature on copyright law’s fair use rule is enormous, with much of the recent spilling of ink bemoaning the overuse of transformativeness as a decisive factor in the case law. Many courts now consider whether a secondary user has added value to a work by including new insights or new aesthetics to be critical in resolving fair use disputes, even if the amount taken from the...